About your Search

20110701
20110731
STATION
CSPAN 60
LANGUAGE
English 60
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 60 (some duplicates have been removed)
including rebekah brooks and james murdock on 26 separate locations. my question is whether he can assure the house that the bid was not raised at any of those meetings. was there at any time he discussed the bid with officials of the culture? >> 10 days ago, the prime minister said i was not given any specific information that would lead you to change my mind. it would have made every effort to uncover the information. they made every effort for the facts. did would surely have led him to change his mind about mr. coulson. all would decline. he was accused of making payments to police. the prime minister did nothing with the information. in may of 2010, he warned the prime minister of bringing him into downing street. he did nothing. on september the fourth 2010, the new york times published an investigation " in most civil -- quoting multiple sources. we know that article is not enough to open their increase. we know it triggers the termination of the metropolitan police. that led to the author. he said it is right that it does not taken up. the question is why. the prime minister was c
. >> >> rebekah brooks was arrested and questioned and the police commissioner resigned in connection with the case. the ongoing investigation was the topic of discussion. this is about 30 minutes. >> buying the silence of public figures that would incriminate your business and publishing confidential medical details of a disabled child to happen to have a famous father. are any of these the action of a fit and proper person? >> my honorable friend makes an extremely powerful point. i think we have to be clear about what is happening. there is a firestorm that is engulfing parts of the media, parts of the police, and political system's ability to respond. what we must do in the coming days and weeks is to think of all of the victims who are watching this today and to make doubly sure that we get to the bottom of what happened and we prosecute those who are guilty. >> about what happened to them, the hawking of the dr.'s found and be terrible treatment of "news of the world." does the prime minister agree with me that it is an insult to the family that rebekah brooks is still in her po
am aware of that mr. brooks or mr. heaton had knowledge of. certainly her knowledge of those things has not been clear. i have seen no evidence of impropriety. >> [unintelligible] is that right? >> yes. >> in october of 2010, did you still believe it when you said you would vigorously pursue the truth? >> yes. >> if you were not worrying bend? >> i do not know. >> you acknowledge they you were misled? >> yes. >> are you aware that in march [unintelligible] police? >> i was not aware at the time. it had been amended. >> if you were anyone else in the organization? investigating it at the time? explaining why? >> let me say something. this is not an excuse. this is less than 1% of the company. distinguished people and professionals. >> [unintelligible] what i am trying to establish is paca how your wrongdoing was -- establish is how your wrongdoing was established at the time. were you made aware of [unintelligible] >> [unintelligible] >> what did they do, subsequent to the arrest? >> i told the investigators and eventually they investigated further. >> what did you do to investigate
. rebekah brooks is also scheduled to appear, but due to arrest earlier today, her appearance is in question. like coverage of that hearing begins tuesday at 9:30 a.m. eastern on c-span3, c-span radio, and act c-span.org. our coverage continues with former british prime minister gordon browns' first major speech to the house of commons since resigning. he talks about his decision not to launch an inquiry into allegations of phone hacking by news international. it also include remarks by labor leader ed miliband. >> we now come to that debate in the name of the leader of the opposition. we call mr. ed miliband. the leader of the scottish national party, and the hon. member for brighton pavilion. i thank them all for joining it -- with the tabling motion before us today. i also thank the members from the conservative benches who set out their support for the motion. mr. speaker, is unusual for a motion in this house to succeed before the debate on it begins, but this is no ordinary motion, and this is no ordinary day. make no mistake, the decision made by news corp. was not the decision that w
.m. there were new developments today in the british film hacking investigation. rebecca brooks was arrested and questioned and paul stevenson resigned in connection with the case. last wednesday, the ongoing investigation was the topic of discussion. this is about 30 minutes. >> thank you. this is an addition to my duties . >> it currently deleting voice mails from a missing teenager. it would incriminate your business. there are confidential medical details. we happen to have this. i asked if these can be actions of the proper person? >> this makes an extremely point. we have to be clear about what is happening. this is engulfing parts of the media and police and the political system's ability. what we must do is think about the victims who are watching this today and make sure that we get to the bulk of what has happened. >> yesterday, i met a family who showed incredible bravery and strength in speaking out about what happened to them. the prime minister, does bigger thing. >> i have made clear that should like to resign. that resignation should have been given. it is becoming clearer. b
tell the house about the conversations she had about the bskyb bid with mr. murdoch and rebecca brooks? >> all the details of the meetings and explain all of the conversations were appropriate and she could ask the members of her party to be equally transparent. >> does the prime minister join me in hoping that this is the end of the ever increasing rise of misconduct by police officers across the country? >> the police have to have an operation, have to have a relationship with the media, both at the top level to communicate with the police's right to do strategically, and at the operational level to help them with crime. we have to try to make sure they do not have an inappropriate relationship. >> prime minister, have you ever mentioned the word "bskyb" in the presence of rebecca brooks? >> does not raise serious questions about how the previous limit operated that members opposite thought that it a prepared for the prime minister to be brief on police matters? and the e-mails that were released, didn't show how professional his chief of staff is? >> i thank my hon. friend for putti
with "washington journal." for now we go live to the brookings institution here in washington. they are going to have a talk on congressional redistricting. the moderator is thomas mann, senior fellow at brookings. several speakers. live coverage on c-span. enjoy the rest of your day. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] we understand some of you are compelled to tweet revenue are. if you do, we know that is the event hashtag. i know you are shocked that i said that, but there it is. [laughter] >> it was written down. >> six months ago, we had a session here, almost to the day. today, we're going to take stock of how the process is unfolding and with what consequences. why do people pay so much attention to redistricting? first of all, is a fascinating game, political junket we cannot resist. we can start talking about the midterm election before and continue on for years after as we try to discern the consequences of it. but much more importantly, they're genuinely high stakes involved in redistricting. certainly, it
in parliament about it and we carry that live on c-span2. we carry rupert murdoch and rebekah brooks yesterday and we will speak about that. how do you describe to an american audience the importance of "news of the world" as the largest selling sunday newspaper in the country, and the closure of that paper? guest: it was shocking. a lot of people were shocked by the closure. it was a sudden and brutal move, and murdoch's decided that enough was enough -- murdochs decided enough was enough and they had to take this extreme step. "news of the world" set the standard for tabloid journalism. it has been a pretty low standard for recent years, but they have always been in front, always seemed to be getting the best spooks, the best gossip -- best scoops, the best gossip. "news of the world" and "the sun," the murdoch daily tabloid, were the epitaph of tabloid journalism. -- epitome of tabloid journalism the rocket. raucous, titillating tabloid journalism, which we enjoy to extan extent. host: did you know, when you were living in london, rebekah brooks at all and her work? guest: she was editor of
friday he revealed that since taking office he had met representatives including rebekah brooks and james murdock on 26 separate locations. my question is whether he can assure the house that the bid was not raised at any of those meetings. was there at any time he discussed the bid iwith officias of the culture? >> 10 days ago, the prime minister said i was not given any specific information that would lead you to change my mind. it would have made every effort to uncover the information. they made every effort for the facts. did would surely have led him to change his mind about mr. coulson. all would decline. he was accused of making payments to police. the prime minister did nothing with the information. in may of 2010, he warned the prime minister of bringing him into downing street. he did nothing. on september the fourth 2010, the new york times published an investigation " in most civil -- quoting multiple sources. we know that article is not enough to open their increase. we know it triggers the termination of the metropolitan police. that led to the author. he said it is right t
to know about the relationship with a back of trucks. what did they talk about? -- rebecca brooks. >> news international has revealed e-mails. he authorized a huge payments to corrupt police officers. that would seem to constitute a criminal offense. he was a witness in the trial for the scottish politician. tom sheridan past him, did the news of the world's a corrupt police officers? he replied, not to my knowledge. four words but not require extensive explanation. his lawyer called on the police to investigate. >> when the company announced two days ago that he had offered up payments to police officers for information, he told the jury that he has no knowledge of payments to police officers. someone is misleading us. he has to answer a perjury charge and that is very serious. >> news international took the action simply not available to david cameron. faced with a scandal that threatens to infect the whole organization, rupert murdoch has taken a knife to his own awkward flesh. >> an extraordinary moment. the victim of its own hocking scandal. >> they are ending a 168-year- old title. >
statement to stop the sun from coming out with an exclusive story. rebecca brooks, the editor of "the sun," got hairy. there was no justification for a statement. this is the not the way things were being done. she was frightened gordon brown was going to stop exclusive. in the end, "the sun" managed to get the story out by being interviewed on the sky news. jordan -- gordon brown issued a positive statements. >> thank you. george it used to be the press secretary. you're a good friend of court in brown. how significant is this about his son? >> i did not know about it until i saw today. i would not want that kind of thing about my children slept all over the papers. i would be upset if it came out. it is another tragic story in this side of it is not over. >> and yet, he still went to her wedding. >> another weird thing about politics. you're on that treadmill . he has a lot of people behind him. i think he probably did not want to go but felt he had to. he would have to ask him why he went. >> this relationship between politicians and this media empire is being increasingly exposed. >>
part. >> that same day the committee also heard from rebekah brooks. a week ago she was arrested and questioned about her knowledge of phone hacking and police bribing. this portion of her testimony is about 25 minutes. >> there are many questions i would like to ask you. >> when we made the very regrettable decisions at news of the world after 168 years, he has predominantly been a news of the world lawyer. we had appointed new lawyers. he left. we have standards we set up. i won't go over it again. you recently talked about it. there are people dealing with it. >> it has been a busy day. as a journalist and editor of "news of the world" how extensively did you work with private detectives? >> i think only somewhat. in relation to privacy, i think back then we answered extensively about the use of private detectives. i think on the tape was the "take a break" magazine. certainly in the top five were "the observer," "the guardian," "news of the world," "daily mail." >> chairman, may i interrupt? i declare that i used to work for "the observer," but left in 2001. the "observer" wa
with us here at brookings this morning, and to our lives c-span audience to a session entitled, a status report on congressional redistricting. now, you may have noticed on the screens, who redistricting di. wondering why that is there. we understand some of you are compelled to tweet wherever you are and if you do, we want you to know that is the event hashtag. i know you are shocked that i actually said that, norm, but there it is. >> it was written down for you. [laughter] >> eye in i am the well-known tweeter. six months ago, we had a session here almost to the day, that was a preview of the redistricting session. today we are going to take stock of how that process is unfolding and with what consequences we can detect at least now. why do people pay so much attention to redistricting? a good question. first of all, it is a fascinating game. political junkies simply can't resist. we can start talking about it the midterm election before and continue on for years after as we try to discern the consequences of it. but more importantly there are gentlemanly high stakes involved in redis
fellow here at brookings, and i'm delighted to welcome all of you. with us here at brookings this morning and to our live espn audience to a -- c-span audience to a session entitled a status report on congressional redistricting. now, you may have noticed on the screens redistricting d.i., wording why that's there. we understand some of you are compelled to tweet wherever you are, and if you do, we want you to know that is the event hash tag. i know you're shocked that i actually said that, norm, but there is it is. >> it was written down so you know. >> i'm a well-known tweeter. six months ago we had a session here, almost to the day, that was a preview of the redistricting session. today we're going to take stock of how that process is unfolding and with what consequences we can detect at least now. why do people pay so much attention to redistricting? good question. first of all, it's a fascinating game. political junkies simply can't resist. we can start talking about it, the midterm election before and continue on for years after as we try to discern the consequences of it but much m
, joseph lau, most recently james forman, edward brooke, patricia brooks, just to name a few. >> the civil rights records come from less obvious collections. >> cancel adams, perhaps the most household name of -- adams, perhaps the household name of america, he wrote a letter that said, i have something that shows the camps in the 1940's. would you be interested? we said, thank you, pretty fast. his empathy for the people in the camps, his skill with portraiture, but also a very complicated subject matter. it a picture of people playing softball inside a relocation camp, it is a wake-up moment, but also a what is going on here? were people unhappy? how was like to continue if your property has been taken from you? how did you keep going and what was flying to happen after the camp? -- what was going to happen after the camp? >> not surprisingly, the library of congress keeps a history of some of the noted people elected to represent their country in both the house and senate. >> they have a special place in the library of congress. we have about 900 collections ranging from the first cut o
, and that is to their running interference for. host: david brooks had a column on monday in "the new york times." he said this -- reareferring to the tax subsidis for corporate jet owners and other tax loopholes being closed. do you agree? caller: yes. guest: i think brooks is oversimplifying there, only because we have had this promise on the table before. we had in 1982 and 1983 and 1990 under a republican president. we have it with the commission's plan. if we're going to work out something involving revenues, we have to see spending cuts taking effect, and has to be in the context of reforming the system, otherwise we will get higher taxes and never get the spending reductions. republicans again have not handled this issue all that well, especially with long-term reforms like the balanced budget amendment, which the leader some -- leadership seemed prepared to through in the tatrash can on the vote. i think it also symbolizes the balance we want to restore to fiscal policy, because the gop had lost its way during the bush era, especially on spending, and continues to stumble on the issues that people
murdoch will testify today. rebekah brooks resigned and was arrested on sunday. coverage is underway at 9:30 a.m. eastern. >> now available, c-span and congressional directory. inside new and returning house and senate members with contact information, twitter addresses, district maps, and information on the white house, supreme court justices. order online. >> "washington journal" is next. we will take your phone calls. the house is in this morning at 10:00 eastern for speeches. they will discuss spending packages at noon eastern. the cut, cap, and balance legislation will be discussed along with possible amendments to the constitution. to the constitution.
a 2008 brookings institute report. it didn't come from the department of agriculture which administers the program. the brookings report collapsed several legislative man dates monday none -- mandated monday none tarry programs including the education -- none monetary programs including the education . and how to do proper breast-feeding. other client services. issues like health care referrals. even immunization screenings. these were counted as administrative costs when they are mandated by us in congress to be carried out. they are programmatic costs. it wasn't proper for the brookings report to include those as administrative costs. breast-feeding, nutrition education, immunization screening are vital programs which improve birth outcomes. and reduce the incidents of health problems. for w.i.c. participants. they should not be categorized as administrative cost foss purposes of budgeting -- costs for purposes of budgeting. today i'd like to pont out that in recent letter to our committee on -- to point out that in a recent letter to our committee on agriculture appropriations which
than three hours. at the end of that, it was still a no. brooks could not be reached for comment. close to 10:30 p.m. party leaders agreed to withdraw their bill and make unspecified changes in the hopes of bringing in more votes. they suggest in the paper after a 9:30 meeting in the house of republicans. and "new york times," inside of the capitol yesterday, in the waning hours of the bill, appeared to turn against the speaker. some key lawmakers, a member of the leadership team, said he would join the other freshmen in his state and wrote knox and they say in a parallel reverse -- on twitter -- freedom works began to send messages pressuring members urging people at home to call members and tell them to vote. no and former governor sarah palin also got in the game posting a warning about contested primaries on facebook. let's go back to bob cusack on capitol hill and talk about the pressure on these undecided members both from other members of their conference and from constituents group outside. guest: it's just enormous as far as republican leaders trying to get members from no to y
not know if you saw david brooks column from monday, but you probably heard about this, "the mother of all no- brainers." guest: ok, i would say this. the republican response to that from people who have been in the room is that mr. brooks was mistaken and the premise. in other words, the fact that he was relying on to offer this opinion or not there, and i know for example senator kyl, the republican whip, said actually there has been quite a bit of discussion about revenue raisers, user fees, the sale of federal property to raise money coming in so to the extent that mr. brooks has perhaps gone one side of the facts, i think it is probably a flawed opinion piece. host: next call comes from new york city. allen, a democrat. caller: thank you very much. i do not even know where to begin. number one, the whole disparity of income, it is like 100 years ago were you have a tiny number of people controlling more and more of the economy. taxes are very low. corporate taxes in this country are almost the lowest in the world. it seems as if all your angling to do is the story obama's presidency a
. the chair: under the speaker's policy of january 6, 2007, the chair recognizes mr. brooks from alabama for half of the time, 22 minutes. mr. brooks: america is the greatest nation in the history of the world. we enjoy a standard of living that is envied by most. we are a beacon of freedom by all. have you ever thought about why america is the world's leader? are we just lucky? no. i would submit there are substantive reasons for our greatness. we are blessed today because of the sacrifices of those before us and those who ensured a better future. history shows us that great nations rise and great nations fall, but they rarely fall from without, without first suffering weakness from within. today, the greatest threat to america is not a foreign power. no, america's greatest threat is washington's irresponsible, dangerous and their spending habits. admiral mullen, chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, testified before the house armed services committee that america's greatest national security threat is our own sustainable and growing debt burden. it wasn't al qaeda. it wasn't north kor
on the battlefield, the doctors and nurses who took care of me in afghanistan, in germany, brooke army medical center, and the subtle for intrepid -- center for intrepid predict amazing work with wondered lawyers and it is a testament to the dedication to our country shows with the medical resources we used to heal and those who literally left pieces of themselves on the battlefield. finally, i like to think the rangers have served with for the past 12 years. the officers and in co's of the 75th ranger regiment, the finest in the world and deserve much credit for who i am today. and to those rangers i have been fortunate enough to lead, during my years of service, you are the best soldiers in the army and it was my greatest honor to have been given the opportunity and responsibility to lead you. all like to also -- i would also like to thank the gathercole family able to attend this great occasion. all of my fallen ranger brothers and servicemen and women of cross the uniformed services, i held them tear in my memory. i embrace the was there is still serving today overseas and every day abroad. thank
, so. >> all right, back to the book. >> yes. >> again, characterizations, david brooks. >> yes. >> a new york times columnist, you called him a big government conservative, what's that. >> yes, yes, he. >> what's that mean? >> he calls himself that. when he was at the weekly standard, he articulated along with william kristol, bill kristol, of the weekly standard, the idea of national greatness conservatism thatwhat conservatives need to really get people's energy up and to build a winning coalition is to indulge in big, great projects that are of national greatnesslet's build big dams, let's have big wars, let's have big kumbaya moments from a conservative point of view andi'm not a fan of that. matt welch is certainly not a fan of that. and i always bring it back to my grandparents who left europe because they didn't want to be part of somebody else's national greatness plan. >> richard nixon -- you call him the "colossus of yorba linda." >> yes, well that's a reference to the iluminados trilogy by robert anton wilson and robert shea, where throughout it, it's a great parody
on twitter -- guest: that's true, in the last week, you have seen david brooks and the economist magazine criticized the republican party for their total unwillingness to talk about tax increases. ronald reagan is their standard bearer and the one they want to follow, he managed the largest tax increase in american history and it helped. they will -- this will end up hurting the republicans. independent voters are seeing this and seeing a party that is the hold and the tea party element. they are not willing to take themselves seriously about issues and they are moving too far to the right for independent voters and it will burn them. host: also this comment on twitter -- what do you think about that? guest: a centrist chances in republican primary is difficult. i think that is the problem with met romney. met romney. h mitt romney. look at what happened in delaware in the senate primary where christy know donald beat her opponents. -- mcdonald -- kristine o'donnell. mitt romney will probably win new hampshire but he will probably lose a whole -- iowa. there are voters that come out and t
. they will be asked about phone hacking by news of the world and other news corporation holdings. rebekah brooks is also scheduled to attend, but because of her arrest earlier today probability to attend is in question. -- her ability to attend is in question. presidential candidate mitt romney recently sat down for an interview in manchester, new hampshire. he talked with potential voters in the studio during a question and answer session. among the issues addressed for job creation and the economy, health care, the budget, debt ceiling negotiations, education, and the situation in afghanistan. a poll thursday shows from the leading the state republican primary among likely voters, with 29% of the vote. rep michele bachman is at 12%. new hampshire hosts the first presidential primary in 2012. this program runs about 25 minutes. >> the new hampshire institute of politics, with financial support from the aarp new hampshire, presents this special -- conversation with the candidates. tonight, governor mitt romney. >> good evening, and welcome to conversation with the candidate. our guest this eveni
, arthur stangard, joseph rowe, most recently james foreman, edward w. brooks, patricia roberts harris, just to name a few. >> but some of the civil rights records come from less obvious collections. >> ansel adams, perhaps the biggest household name of a photographer in the united states still. ansel adams wrote a letter to the library of congress, he said, i have these photographs that show the relocation camp back in the 1940's. would you be interested. we said thank you pretty fast. a photographer usually associated with majestic landscape views, his empathy for the people in the camp, his skill with portraiture, but it's also a very complicated subject matter. so a picture of people playing softball inside a war relocation camp, it is a wakeup moment, an aha moment, but also a what is going on here? were people unhappy or satisfied? how was life able to continue if you're locked up? how did you keep going? what was going to happen after the camp? >> not surprisingly, the library of congress keeps a history of some of the noted people who were elected to represent their countries i
minister met 26 times with executives including mr. merdock and his son and rebecca brooks the former and chief executive and the news editor of the new of the world who re-assigned on friday. along with his son. we'll have live coverage tuesday morning on the c-span networks including c-span radio. more of the "washington journal" in a moment. speaking of radio. the studios look at some of the other guests and issues dominating the program. good morning nancy. >> sunday afternoons on c-span radio you can hear re-airs and topics include deth negotiations and presidential politics we begin at noon with meet the press. david gregory welcomes jack lou director and republican senator and assistant majority leader. dick during bin and national yo bin lead president. this week hosted by collisionhr. also on the program. minority whip john kyle. fox news sunday at 2 p.m. chris wallace talks with gop herman cane. republican congressmen and the leading democrat on the house budget committee. then at 3 o'clock it's cnn state of the union. welcoming jack lou. republican senator lindsay graham a
, a woman called rebecca brooks and number of celebrities and public relations people. there is a very unusual and tight bond between members of the political establishment in the united kingdom and members of the media establishment that have gone on for some years now. it's been developing through different situations but it's laboring and conservative. but, it has become intense. that also ruptured this week. host: events involving the publication "news of the world" set to close tomorrow. our topic for this segment. if you want to ask our guest questions, 202-624-111. tweets, you can send to us off of c-span wj. have there been form charges, with everything you've talked about, have there been form charges filed? guest: not against andy coulson. we have had the former royal reporter of "news of the world" has previously been jailed. and was rearrested yesterday. but we do need to treat some of this with care. there are two separate police investigations going on now the london arm of rupert murdoch media group is now fully cooperating with, they say. and has been since january this
responsibility. >> you said that the question of repressed the brooks -- rebecca brooks'future is a matter for conscience. how was your conscience? >> i have accepted the areas where we could do better. my conscience is clear in that i have respect -- expressed regrets for that. if you cannot be allowed to express regrets and make money -- some states, it will be a sad state of affairs. >> was a mistake to talk about the victim's commit given into except you did not carry out the review? >> it gave back to the little of buys and what we could approve. it is a doll semantic point. >> do you think it was right to be so clear and categorical when actually you could not possibly have known because you have not reviewed all of the evidence? >> i just went with the legal it buys. -- advise. >> what was your inquiry for? what was the previous inquiry? >> that is a matter for the new inquiry answer. the inquiry in shape to make it manageable in the context that was happening at the time. i think that as a matter for them to answer. >> in terms of the victims, the last time you hear, specifically c
officer and the rest of rebekah brooks, the former ceo of rupert murdoch's news international. mr. murdoch, his son james and ms. brooks are set to testify before a parliamentary inquiry tomorrow. you can hear it live at 9:30 a.m. eastern here on c-span radio. those are some of the latest headlines. >> had ever visited the library of congress? over 2 million people have and now this is your chance to tour the world's largest library. tonight, join c-span for a rare glimpse inside the library of congress. we will take you into the great hall and explore the main reading room. unique books and rare books and special collections including original books from thomas jefferson's personal collection. but we will see how the library is using modern technology to discover hidden secrets and preserve its holdings for future generations. join us for the library of congress tonight at 8:00 p.m. eastern and pacific on c-span. host available on television, radio, online and social media networking sites. fine air content any time through seas and video library. -- find our content any time through c-sp
murdoch, his son james, and reb ekah brooks. bbc newsnight tell us tell they are covering the story. >> tonight, robert mcdowell on the fcc's action to begin cracking down on unauthorized service charges to cell phone bills. that is tonight on "de communicators -- "the communicators." the nuclear regulatory agency officially make recommendations within 90 days. the industry would have five years for any new regulations to come from the process. >> we are honored to be here today, speaking at this venerable institution. the national press club is a venue like no other. it has been at the center of washington news. as i was preparing for this, in my staff did a little investigation, they understood the historic emblem was that of an owl. i will not claim wisdom and i will let you judge my awareness, but i can relate to the long nights spent sleepless on the job. as chairman of the new tillage -- the nuclear regulatory commission, one of the best aspects of my job is having the opportunity to lead a staff of nearly 4000 talented public servants. we hear from all sides and all perspecti
the allegations on tuesday. there will be joined by rebekah brooks who resigned last week. on sunday, she was arrested and questioned about her knowledge of phone hacking and police bribery at news of the world. live coverage and 9:30 a.m. eastern. the house rules committee met to debate deficit-reduction legislation that the republicans are calling cut, cap, and balance. president obama has issued a veto threat for the measure. it requires congress to pass a balanced budget amendment to the constitution as a condition for raising the federal debt ceiling. the full house will pick up the legislation to more appeared to technical problems, we rejoin our coverage in process. >> i think it rose red meat to the extreme right wing of the republican party. over the last several weeks, the white house and congressional leaders from both parties have been in negotiations, trying to figure out a way to get by this impasse. here we are getting close to the day, and rather than trying to figure out how to come together, this is a sharp right turn. this drives us off the cliff. this is not an attempt
the brookings institute. we will h-- >> we have more froe brookings institute. this is about one hour. >> we were very excited putting this panel together. after watching the abalone shell, i turned to glenn and asked where his was. i want to put this in context after hearing from the scientists. i think there are three economic issues the hamilton project is focused on right now. the first is we're continuing to suffer from the aftermath of the terrible financial crisis. there are 15 million americans out of work. by standard calculations, it could take up to a dozen years to work through that towards something that resembles full employment. that is a problem we have to confront. the second one is of a longer- term nature. we have been in this slump with respect to wages for most americans. one measure we have developed is not that wages have stagnated over the last 40 years, but they have declined by 28%. the third situation that confronts the country is our fiscal situation is less than ideal. the debt to gdp ratio is increasing. we're reaching levels where countries have historical invi
to the gentleman from alabama who i don't believe shares that opinion, the gentleman, mr. brooks. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for two minutes. mr. brooks: thank you, mr. speaker. back home in my district, one of the things i'm understanding in communicating with people is the difficulty in their difference of understanding in millions in debt, blts in debt and trillions in debt. i heard an analogy the other day that will help the american people better understand the financial situation of the united states of america. imagine that you're a pamly and you haven't been keeping track of your finances for a while. finally you decide to sit down at your kitchen table, the two spouses get together and they accumulate their income, they accumulate their expenses, they accumulate their debt. and as they go through their income they discover they have about $50,000 that they can spend, that's their income, for the upcoming year. and then they look at their expenses and put all the bills together and how they spent over the past year and discover that last year they spent $80,000.
programming with a review of federal regulations from the brookings institution. that is at 8:00 p.m. eastern. about a half hour later, we will have more from the brookings institution with a forum on innovation and the u.s. economy with an emphasis on science and technology. former white house economic advisor lawrence summers takes part. about an hour later it is the national organization for women's conference, featuring former colorado conscience woman pat schreoder. that is at 9:30 eastern. >> tune in this independence day. we discuss if the united states can remain united. >> at the political level we are more divided. if you look at partisan polarization if you look at that, than any point since the reconstruction. >> they talk about religion, violence and the death party. insiders in the white house discuss the president's foreign policy. this july 4th beginning at 10 a.m. eastern. for a complete listing of programs and times, go to c-span.org. >> this fourth of july three-day weekend on american history twonch on c-span 3, we will visit the smithsonian museum to learn about an expedi
brook haven national laboratory, a department of energy lab and one of the largest employers in my district. b&l is also ground zero for many of the scientific discoveries and innovations that have expanded our understanding about physics and nature, many of which have a direct link to developing new materials for industry, more effective drugs and better fuel, the intellectual capital that private industry thrives upon. mr. chairman, earlier this year the republican policies embodied within h.r. 1 would have slashed $1.1 billion from the office of science, choking off federal investment in basic research that is the key to our nation's long-term competitiveness. these draconian cuts would have impacted each d.o.e. national lab with a 30% cut to every science facility and program from the f.y. 2011 request level. the number of jobs that would have been eliminated as a result of h.r. 1 is estimated to be close to 10,000 in the office of science. how can any reasonable person argue that laying off thousands of the most highly trained, highly skilled scientists the world has to offer
by the brookings institution, this panel is about an hour. >> i was a host of the show called "the next big thing, " and so we're going to look at the next big thing. francis collins played a significant note -- role in this project. what is going to me next? what do you say has emerged in will emerge as the possible next big thing? >> it has been tenure stuns the publication of the draft sequence of the human genome. there has been a decade-long experience and paramount about reflection of how far we've come in those 10 years. for researchers, this is utterly transformed the way that we ask in tried answer questions about human biology. graduate students have a hard time imagining how actually people did anything worthwhile in studying human biology without this information. it is so much a minute to minute, hour at our experience of going to the web, clicking with your mouse, and pulling down information about our instructions, and increasingly layered on top of that is phenomenally interesting in its formation. -- interesting information. there is the thousand genome project which lays out gre
in the relationship of the party with news international. >> rebekah brooks resigned and was arrested. the head of the metropolitan police resigned. rupert murdoch and james murdoch appeared before the commons. >> what happened at "the news of the world" was wrong. we have apologized profusely for that. these are very serious matters. thee trying to establish facts of any new allegations as they come up. we're working closely with the police to find out where the wrongdoing was and to hold people accountable. >> do you think it is possible that editors of your newspaper would not have known about these activities? >> i cannot say that because of the police inquiries. i presume there are coming judicial proceedings. >> at what point did you find out that criminality was endemic @ "the news of the world"? >> endemic is a very wide- ranging word. i also had to be extremely careful not to prejudice the course of justice taking place now. that has been disclosed. i became aware as it became apparent. >> mr. murdoch, had you considered resigning since this occurred on your watch? >> no,. >> why not?
police officers within the law. you cannot. it should stop. earlier this year, rebekah brooks was asked to clarify that. i was responding to a specific line of questioning on how newspapers get information. my intention was to comment on the belief that payments had been made in the past two police officers. if i gave the impression i had knowledge of specific cases, i can assure you that this is not my intention. who even more worryingly, only last night we discover that they had handed over copies of documents that appeared to show that the former editor authorized a series of payments to police officers onto tens of thousands of pounds. the truth is, they were doing it appeared that cannot be allowed to get away with it. i know "news of the world" seems to be hanging. surely, the buck stops at these to top. >> i agree with what is being said appeared can we agree that we must not have the possibility of successful prosecutions of people who did these things? >> i will try to prove this. i think it is absolutely essential. my hope is that people who committed criminality is will end u
york, is a leader in clean energy jobs, but don't take my word for it. the brookings institution recently completed a study that found the capital region has the largest share of green jobs in the country. over 6%. that's over 28,000 green jobs. and not only is the region growing now, it is poised for growth in the future. whether at albany nanotech, g.e., plug power, or global foundries, the capital region is producing the high-tech manufacturing jobs of today and tomorrow. this doesn't just impact our domestic economy. along with l.a., new york, and san francisco, albany is the only other metro area contributing $1 billion annually in the clean export economy. we can make it in america. we can manufacture the best products in the world here and do so in a way that grows jobs and rebuilds our economy. the real question is, does this congress believe we are worthy of that investment? i think we are. let's invest in jobs for america and in so doing let's cut the deficit. this report from brookings institution proves it. thank you, mr. speaker. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore
. . the chair recognizes the gentleman from alabama, mr. brooks, for five minutes. mr. brooks: thank you, mr. speaker. i have voted to raise the debt ceiling where the bill makes america's financial condition better, not worse. both the reid and boehner plans failed to adequately address unsustainable deficits that threaten america with insolvency and bankruptcy. both plans put the debt ceiling issue to 2012 or 2013 at which time a financially weaker america will confront a worse debt ceiling crisis. both plans simply are not up to the seriousness of the financial challenges america faces. washington must put 2012 election considerations aside and put america's interests first and foremost now. congress and the white house can and must do better now. america deserves better now. and quite frankly we have no choice but to do better now. years of spending binges have come to roost. america has suffered $3 trillion deficits and faces trillion dollar deficit noose the foreseeable future. annual deficits and accumulated debt force america to confront two major financial threat, both with one comm
-- brookings institution says -- that they hash it out in private first. your thoughts? caller: my thought is that if people cannot get together and talk it out, compromise, what is the use of having separate get together is? tempore i know that i sound ignorant, but people need to sit down in a circle and come to a conclusion. host: another twitter message from boring file clerk, writing -- host: chattanooga, tennessee. gerry, go ahead. caller: thank you for c-span. what president obama doing basically let the republicans hide in his administration. you have a republican party in place. this is where it came from. you have these tax cuts, medicare part b. president obama is not going to change those tax breaks. we are still in a fix with these republican parties. we need to come out of these wars. republicans are deliberately trying to sabotage this economy because this is the only way they can get someone elected in this economy. everything else to sell or group -- sour grapes. keeping the unemployment rate at the level that it is. they are trying to destroy this economy. host: some of t
remember douglas frazier and roger brooks, the wonderful drivers. they would be horrified. but the point is the saipe. that friendship made governing possible. they did not question each other's motives for their commitment to the country. underlying those across the aisle and across the dome, congressional friendship was the relationships among the wives. . .mrs. ford plays all those roles. cub scouts and den mother's seem weak until you have tried it. [laughter] she was a leader in the congressional prayer group and yet her official title as it was for most political wives was a housewife. it was a title she shared with many american women and it gave her a great understanding about what women's lives were like. she said once,"being a good housewife seems to be a much tougher job than going to the office and getting paid for it." she was giving words to the dirty little secret that men always knew. over the years, she spoke out more forcefully for women's rights. she strongly defended the housewife's role. no wonder women all over the country have spent this past weekend loving her ane
. on the case of rebecca brooks, i don't think it is right for the prime minister to start picking and choosing who should run and who should not run media organizations. it has been reported that she offered her resignation over this. before i take your questions, let me say this. for people watching this scandal unfolded, there is something disturbing about what they see. just think about who they put their trust in. the politicians that represent them, and all of them -- a political system that people think is on their side and a press that is yet free and vigorous and holds those in power to drive them completely mad. we need a free press that is all so clean and trustworthy. that is what people want, that is not what i want. -- and that is what i want. >> we have asked him many times about your decision to appoint an be as your main communications man. you said that he resigned and paid the price. given that hundreds of people lost their jobs yesterday, given that the editor said that he warned you of what they might have had and you would have known what would have happened under his watc
. his son and rebekah brooks are also expected to appear. those are some of the latest headlines on c-span radio. >> the c-span network -- we provide coverage of politics, public affairs, nonfiction books, and american history. it is all available to you. find our content any time throughout c-span's video library. bringing our resources to your community. is washington, -- it is washington, your way. >> ann coulter has something to say. sunday, august 7, your chance to talk to the new york times best selling author and syndicated columnist. three hours, starting at noon eastern on c-span2. >> "washington journal" continues. host: karen bass, a democrat, representing california's 33rd district. good morning. talk to us about the cut, cap & balance vote today in the house. do you think any democrats will vote for it? guest: frankly, i think it is very, very bad policy. some of the measures that are in this bill already exist in california. for example, it only takes a majority vote to cut taxes in california, two-thirds vote to raise revenue. everybody every year watches the impact tha
for it. on the case of rebecca brooks, i don't think it is right for the prime minister to start picking and choosing who should run and who should not run media organizations. it has been reported that she offered her resignation over this. in this situation, i would have taken it. before i take your questions, let me say this. for people watching this scandal unfolded, there is something disturbing about what they see. just think about who they put their trust in. the police to protect them. the politicians that represent them, and all of them -- a political system that people think is on their side and a press that is yet free and vigorous and holds those in power to drive them completely mad. we need a free press that is all so clean and trustworthy. that is what people want, that is not what i want. -- and that is what i want. and i will not rest until we get it. thank you for listening. i'm very happy to take some questions. >> we have asked him many times -- you many times about your decision to appoint an be as your main communications man. you said that he resigned and paid the
to go home and learn how to. host: fixed the political experts from the book -- brookings institution says -- that ty hashnt it out in private first. your thoughts? caller: my thought is that if people cannot get together and talk it out, compromise, what is the use of having separate get together is? tempore i know that i sound ignorant, but people need to sit down in a circle and come to a conclusion. host: another twitter message from boring file clerk, writing -- host: chattanooga, tennessee. gerry, go ahead. caller: thank you for c-span. what president obama doing basically let the republicans hide in his administration. you have a republican party in place. this is where it came from. you have these tax cuts, medicare part b. president obama is not going to change those tax breaks. we are still in a fix with these republican parties. we need to come out of these wars. republicans are deliberately trying to sabotage this economy because this is the only way they can get someone elected in this economy. everything else to sell or group -- sour grapes. keeping the unemployment rate
to act responsibly. mr. brooks: in contrast the president gives fine speeches yet fails to submit a single written plan to balance the budget that can be evaluated by the american people. mr. speaker, i say bore us with the details. washington spending binge has put america $14 trillion in debt. america's future is at risk. congress welcomes written key tailed solutions to washington spending binge from the president. mr. speaker, i reiterate, please bore us with the details. america has a right to hear them. president obama has the duty to deliver them. thank you, mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from delaware rise? without objection, the gentleman from delaware is recognized for one minute. mr. carney: mr. chair, i rise today in support of efforts to find a cure for type one diabetes. recently i visited with 11-year-old madly tollman from my home state of delaware. she was here to tell her story of what it's like to live with type 1 diabetes. madeline has to check her blood sugar levels, managing her diet, and injecting herself with insul
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 60 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (31 Dec 2014)